Countdown header img desk

MAI SUNT 00:00:00:00

MAI SUNT

X

Countdown header img  mob

MAI SUNT 00:00:00:00

MAI SUNT

X

Promotii popup img

-20% -83% la Humanitas

siii Transport GRATUIT

la toate comenzile peste 50 lei!

Comanda acum!
Close

Discovering the True Self: Kodo Sawaki's Art of Zen Meditation

Discovering the True Self: Kodo Sawaki's Art of Zen Meditation - Kodo Sawaki

Discovering the True Self: Kodo Sawaki's Art of Zen Meditation


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.

These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.

Citeste mai mult

-10%

transport gratuit

91.67Lei

101.86 Lei

Sau 9167 de puncte

!

Fiecare comanda noua reprezinta o investitie pentru viitoarele tale comenzi. Orice comanda plasata de pe un cont de utilizator primeste in schimb un numar de puncte de fidelitate, In conformitate cu regulile de conversiune stabilite. Punctele acumulate sunt incarcate automat in contul tau si pot fi folosite ulterior, pentru plata urmatoarelor comenzi.

Livrare in 2-4 saptamani

Descrierea produsului


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.

These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are "an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation" (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.


These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.
These profound Zen Buddhism teachings explained in ordinary language from one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century are an essential resource for those interested in Zen meditation (Publishers Weekly).

"You can't see your true Self. [But] you can become it. Becoming your true Self is zazen."

Having come of age as an orphan in the slums of Tsu City, Japan, Kodo Sawaki had to fight his way to adulthood, and became one of the most respected Zen masters of the 20th century. He had a great understanding of Dogen Zenji's teaching and he knew how to express Dogen's philosophy in clear, easily-understood language. Sawaki's primary mission was to bring all people to an awareness of the Self, which he believed came through Zen meditation.

His humor and straightforward talk garnered Sawaki followers from all walks of life. Though he remained poor by choice, he was rich in spirit. Two of his students who became known in America as well as in Japan were Kosho Uchiyama, abbot of Antaiji Temple and author of Opening The Hand of Thought, and Gudo Nishijima, Zen teacher and translator of Dogen's Shobogenzo.

A student of Kosho Uchiyama, Arthur Braverman has compiled an anthology of Sawaki's writings and a garland of sayings gathered from throughout his lifetime. One of a few collections of Sawaki's teachings published in English, his life and work bracket the most intriguing and influential period of modern Zen practice in Japan and America.

Citeste mai mult

Detaliile produsului

De acelasi autor

De pe acelasi raft

Parerea ta e inspiratie pentru comunitatea Libris!

Noi suntem despre carti, si la fel este si

Newsletter-ul nostru.

Aboneaza-te la vestile literare si primesti un cupon de -10% pentru viitoarea ta comanda!

*Reducerea aplicata prin cupon nu se cumuleaza, ci se aplica reducerea cea mai mare.

Ma abonez image one
Ma abonez image one