Countdown header img desk

MAI SUNT 00:00:00:00

MAI SUNT

X

Countdown header img  mob

MAI SUNT 00:00:00:00

MAI SUNT

X

Galatea PB

Galatea PB - John Lyly

Galatea PB


Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the play a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today. Designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court, opening a window onto a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century writers, such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the play is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories allow an insight into the work's susceptibility to reinterpretation.
Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Citeste mai mult

-10%

44.77Lei

49.74 Lei

Sau 4477 de puncte

!

Fiecare comanda noua reprezinta o investitie pentru viitoarele tale comenzi. Orice comanda plasata de pe un cont de utilizator primeste in schimb un numar de puncte de fidelitate, In conformitate cu regulile de conversiune stabilite. Punctele acumulate sunt incarcate automat in contul tau si pot fi folosite ulterior, pentru plata urmatoarelor comenzi.

Livrare in 2-4 saptamani

Descrierea produsului


Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the play a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today. Designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court, opening a window onto a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century writers, such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the play is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories allow an insight into the work's susceptibility to reinterpretation.
Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Devised as an entertainment for a Tudor monarch and engaged with matters particularly pertinent to the Elizabethan state, Galatea might be seen, paradoxically, as a parable for our time. Inhabiting a world threatened with inundation and engaged in a process of change, the characters find themselves locked in a series of transgressive situations that speak directly to contemporary experience and twenty-first-century critical concerns. Same-sex relationships, shifts of authority, and the destabilization of meaning all lend the drama a surprising modernity, making it at once the most accessible of Lyly's plays and the one most frequently performed today.

Specifically designed for the student reader, Leah Scragg's edition offers a range of perspectives on the work. An extensive introduction locates the play in the context of the Elizabethan court and the performance of plays by juvenile troupes, opening a window upon a kind of drama very different from that of more familiar sixteenth-century dramatists such as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter's indebtedness to the work is fully documented, while detailed critical and performance histories afford an insight into the susceptibility of the work to reinterpretation.

Newly edited from the earliest witness, the quarto of 1592, and richly annotated for the modern reader, this edition allows access to the work of a writer who was a central figure in the cultural life of late sixteenth-century England and is still capable of speaking to audiences today.

Citeste mai mult

De pe acelasi raft

Parerea ta e inspiratie pentru comunitatea Libris!

Noi suntem despre carti, si la fel este si

Newsletter-ul nostru.

Aboneaza-te la vestile literare si primesti un cupon de -10% pentru viitoarea ta comanda!

*Reducerea aplicata prin cupon nu se cumuleaza, ci se aplica reducerea cea mai mare.

Ma abonez image one
Ma abonez image one