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Jeeves and the Leap of Faith: A Novel in Homage to P. G. Wodehouse

Jeeves and the Leap of Faith: A Novel in Homage to P. G. Wodehouse - Ben Schott

Jeeves and the Leap of Faith: A Novel in Homage to P. G. Wodehouse


PG Wodehouse's Jeeves and Wooster return in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard) by bestselling author Ben Schott, full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery.

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious espionage caper.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is iceberg, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

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PG Wodehouse's Jeeves and Wooster return in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard) by bestselling author Ben Schott, full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery.

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious espionage caper.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is iceberg, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk
Jeeves and Wooster return in a new espionage caper full of japes, high jinks, and jiggery-pokery in a series that is "impossible to read without grinning idiotically" (Evening Standard).

The Drones club's in peril. Gussie's in love. Spode's on the war path. Oh, and His Majesty's Government needs a favor . . .

I say It's a good thing Bertie's back, what?

In his eagerly anticipated sequel to Jeeves and the King of Clubs, Ben Schott leads Jeeves and Wooster on another elegantly uproarious escapade.

From the mean streets of Mayfair to the scheming spires of Cambridge, we encounter a joyous cast of characters: chiseling painters and criminal bookies, eccentric philosophers and dodgy clairvoyants, appalling poets and pocket dictators, vexatious aunts and their vicious hounds.

But that's not all:
Who is ICEBERG, and why is he covered in chalk?
Why is Jeeves reading Winnie-the-Pooh?
What is seven across and eighty-five down?
How do you play Russian Roulette at The Savoy?

These questions, and more, are answered in Jeeves and the Leap of Faith -- an homage to P.G. Wodehouse, authorized by his estate, and essential reading for fans of The Master.

Tinkety-tonk

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