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Tell the Bosses We're Coming: A New Action Plan for Workers in the Twenty-First Century

Tell the Bosses We're Coming: A New Action Plan for Workers in the Twenty-First Century - Shaun Richman

Tell the Bosses We're Coming: A New Action Plan for Workers in the Twenty-First Century


Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."

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Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."


How labor union organizing can help leverage today's movements, and why workers need unions more than ever before

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security... Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes - and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members - why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We're Coming.

It's time to bring unions back from the edge of institutional annihilation, says Richman. But that is no simple proposition. Richman explains how important it is that this book is published now, because the next few years offer a rare opportunity to undo the great damage wrought on labor by decades of corporate union-busting, if only union activists raise our ambitions. Based on deft historical research and legal analysis, as well as his own experience as a union organizing director, Richman lays out an action plan for U.S. workers in the twenty-first century by which we can internalize the concept that workers are equal human beings, entitled to health care, dignity, job security - and definitely, the right to strike. Unafraid to take on some of the labor movement's sacred cows, this book describes what it would take - some changes that are within activists' power and some that require meaningful legal reform - to put unions in workplaces across America. As Shaun Richman says, "I look forward to working with you."

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