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The Riot Grrrl Collection

The Riot Grrrl Collection - Lisa Darms

The Riot Grrrl Collection


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents "a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be" (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world."Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick

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Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents "a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be" (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world."Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick


Archival material from the 1990s underground movement that presents a snapshot of what riot grrrl was and could be (Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill).

For the past two decades, young people have found their way to feminism through Riot Grrrl. Against the backdrop of the culture wars and before the rise of the Internet or desktop publishing, the zine and music culture of the Riot Grrrl movement empowered young women across the country to speak out against sexism and oppression, creating a powerful new force of liberation and unity within and outside of the women's movement.

While feminist bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile fought for their place in a male-dominated punk scene, their members and fans developed an extensive DIY network of activism and support. The Riot Grrrl Collection reproduces a sampling of the original zines, posters, and printed matter for the first time since their initial distribution in the 1980s and '90s, and includes an original essay by Johanna Fateman and an introduction by Lisa Darms.

"The materials in this book are more important than ever. Riot grrrl shows us that feminism isn't synonymous with consumer empowerment. Passed person to person, riot grrrl culture advances a true revolution in which 'girl' qualities like candor and empathy are no longer trivialized and can re-make the world.Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick

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