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The Souls of Black Folk

The Souls of Black Folk - W. E. B. Du Bois

The Souls of Black Folk


"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.

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"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.
W. E. B. Du Bois' insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation--a masterpiece in the African-American canon

"Jonathan Holloway introduces W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 classic for our time, when visions of a 'post-racial' America clash with the enduring centrality of what Du Bois termed 'the problem of the color-line.' We need Du Bois now more than ever."--Adam Bradley, University of Colorado, Boulder

This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on Black history, racism, and the struggles of Black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line," and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and "Negro music," and remain essential reading in our so-called "post-racial age." A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois's signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours.

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